The Oscars – Recap

Jennifer Lawrence, really? Like, for real?!? I couldn’t believe my ears when I heard it. Her role, and subsequently performance, was totally unconvincing. I am so incredibly disappointed. As you know, I felt strongly that Quvenzhane Wallis from Beasts of the Southern Wild should win. But oh well, let’s move on.

Next shocker: Michelle Obama announcing the winner. Really First Lady, you got nothing better to do? This just goes to show that politics (not just in the U.S.) are all a part of the show for the masses.

In any case, not the worst outcome there with Argo taking the statue. I’m glad, even though I don’t feel this was a masterpiece.

Amour at least won the Best Foreign Picture category, so that pleases me.

Ang Lee totally deserved the Oscar for directing. Life of Pi is not a book that translates easily onto screen, and he did more than a fantastic job.

Daniel Day-Lewis deserved to enter history by becoming the first to win Best Lead Actor three times.

Anne Hathway taking the Oscar home – that was a no brainer. I cannot not comment on how gorgeous her entire look was.

And I’m so happy that Christoph Waltz was able to take the podium, too (I know many of you feel the same as well). We all knew that Django wouldn’t win, just as we knew that Tarantino would be awarded for Best Original Screenplay.

Daniel Day-Lewis, Jennifer Lawrence, Anne Hathaway, Christoph Waltz

All in all, there were no spectacular surprises, considering the list was poor to begin with. I’m looking forward to seeing what awaits us in 2013, and I hope you’ll be there with me to comment on it.

Now tell me, are you satisfied with the outcome?

Amour

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Definitely my pick for the Oscar.

Its simple title – love – has been confusing me since I first heard of the film. Naturally, I have had to watch it to grasp its true, complex meaning. While the story centers around a married elderly couple, Georges and Anne, and their lives after Anne suffers a stroke, the title is not reserved for them alone. Rather, it is there to point out the extent to which this word is absent from everyday interactions.

Georges who is left to look after his wife’s well being has to pay everyone else for their services – the hospital guys for delivering the wife back home, the neighbouring couple for going grocery shopping, the nurses – even the bad one. Love has been replaced with currency, Haneke (writer and director) suggests. No one in this film is motivated by the feeling, everyone is simply focused on what they will gain; except for Anne’s former student. He is the only one who acts out of gratitude. Before she suffered a stroke, Anne was a piano teacher. When the students visits, the couple recount about how much they loved his concert, and remark that they had neglected to buy his CD. They make a point of how they wanted to purchase his CD because they wanted to contribute to his career. Later on in the movie, they receive his disc in the mail. I felt a warmth around my heart at the gesture which stands out from the ruthless, business-like interactions among the rest of the individuals in the film.

Oddly enough, it is this absence of love that awakened my sense of humanity in me, making me even more sympathetic towards my fellow human beings.

The film also reminded me that life can always get worse, and that we should enjoy every single second of our existence. So have a good, JOYOUS life everyone!!

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